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Green Templeton College | Oxford

News & Views

December

More than 40 dead in Siberia after drinking bath oil hoping for alcohol buzz
The Sydney Morning Herald, 20/12/2016, David Filipov
Article on deaths in Russia notes research into trends in alcohol death rates in Russia by Sir Richard Peto of the University of Oxford.Read the article in The Sydney Morning Herald online

In Italy, Anguish on Both Sides of Asylum Pleas
New York Times, 11/12/2016, p.A6, Jim YardleyAn article on issues affecting migrants in Italy includes comment from Professor Alexander Betts of the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford, who said: “Collectively, the world has a real challenge in how we categorize people who cross international borders. We will see displacement and mobility as defining issues of the 21st century.”Read the article in the New York Times online

November

How it feels to...live like a wild animal

Sunday Times (Magazine), 27/11/2016, p.50, Shobha Prabhu Naik
Interview with Charles Foster, who teaches medical law and ethics at Oxford University, in which he discusses his attempts to live like different types of animal, including badgers and urban foxes.Read the article in the Sunday Times online

‘We've been deceived’: Many clinical trial results are never published
CBC (Canada), 25/11/2016
A new online tool developed at Oxford University aims to put pressure on companies and institutions who do not publish the results of clinical trials. TrialsTracker maintains a list of all the trials registered on the world’s leading clinical trials database and tracks how many of them are updated with results. ‘It's well documented that academic triallists routinely fail to share results,’ says Ben Goldacre, who was part of the team from the University of Oxford that developed TrialsTracker. ‘Often they think, misguidedly, that a “negative” result is uninteresting – when, in fact, it is extremely useful.’Read the article in CBC online

Can EU deal with refugee issue humanely?

Chicago Tribune (USA), 12/11/2016, Futoshi Mori, via Japan TimesArticle on EU refugee policy notes that Alexander Betts at the University of Oxford has proposed a matching system in which each of the EU countries list the human resources and occupations they need, decide quotas and then present the numbers to refugees.

Read the article in the Chicago Tribune online

Patients to get instant tests at chemists to see if they need antibiotics
Daily Telegraph , 11/11/16, Laura Donnelly

Green Templeton alumnus, Dr Mahiben Maruthappu is referred to in this article as being co-founder of the NHS Innovation Accelerator which has brought about a walk-in pharmacy test of whether somebody with a sore throat needs antibiotics.

Read the article in the Daily Telegraph online

Stealth slimming
Daily Mail, 08/11/2016, p.47Cold air is likely to help your body develop a type of fat called brown (or beige) fat, which raises your metabolism so that you burn more calories, says Professor Ashley Grossman, an endocrinologist from Oxford University. In the past, it was thought that we possessed this type of fat only as babies and that, by adulthood, it had turned into what is known as white fat (which doesn’t burn calories). ‘But we now believe that exposure to cooler temperatures can change white fat into beige fat in adulthood,’ says Professor Grossman.

Give refugees basic human freedoms and everyone will be better off
Wired UK, 03/11/2016, Ruby Lott-Lavigna
Profile of Alexander Betts, director of the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford, and his talk at the Wired2016 event. Looking at economic models that have been set up in refugee camps in Uganda, Betts argues that our misconception about refugees is resulting in a loss of a productive and beneficial labour force - as well as a chance to help those fleeing from potential persecution. ‘We need to see it as an economic issue,’ he explained. ‘They have skills and talents.’ He also discussed his research into the pioneering approach to refugees taken by Uganda, which gives refugees the right to work and freedom of movement.

Read the articke in Wired

 

October

Academics receive recognition award
Oxford Mail, p.11, 25/10/2016Three leading social scientists from Oxford University have been made Fellows of The Academy of Social Sciences. They have been recognised for the excellence and impact of their work. They are Professor Jo-Anne Baird, Pearson professor of educational assessment and director of the department of education, Professor David Clark, professor of experimental psychology, and Professor Mary Daly, professor of sociology and social policy. Professor Roger Goodman, Chairman of the Academy, said: ‘I am delighted that we have been able to confer a Fellowship on all these eminent social scientists. It is particularly gratifying to include a larger number of economists, policy makers and practitioners.

Bicycle scheme may expand to other cities
Oxford Mail, p.24, 20/10/2016

An Oxford bicycle sharing scheme has been so successful that it is set to expand to five more cities. An app launched in April has grown, with more than 200 cycles being hired out by commuters, students, professors and tourists for as little as £1 per day. The service by Cycle.Land has 1,000 regular users, who are sent a location and a code to their smart phone to unlock the cycle. Cycle.Land’s chief executive Agne Milukatie, an Oxford graduate, said it might be rolled out in Cambridge, Bristol, Brighton, London and Edinburgh as well as expanded in Oxford.

11 ways to stop periods from disrupting girls’ education
The Guardian online (global development professionals network), 19/10/2016, Anna LeachJulie Hennegan, a doctoral candidate at the University of Oxford, contributes to a discussion about how to remove some of the barriers that can limit girls’ access to education after puberty.Read the article in the Guardian online

Why Uganda is one of the world's most hospitable refugee destinations
PBS News online (News Hour), 19/10/2016, UnattributedTranscript of a discussion on Uganda’s role in accepting refugees from other African nations. Alexander Betts of Oxford University is one of the contributors to the discussion.

Read the transcript at PBS News online

HE and me
Times Higher Education, 13/10/2016, p.22-23

Charles Foster, senior research associate at Oxford University, is interviewed following his Ig Nobel Prize for Biology after he lived as various animals to explore ‘what it is really like to be a beast.’Read the article in the Times Higher Education online

Give women testosterone to boost their sex drive
The Times, 08/10/2016, p.35Ashley Grossman, an Oxford endocrinologist, comments on proposals that women could be prescribed testosterone to treat low libido.

Read the article in The Times online
"Why I lived like a badger, an otter, a deer and a swift": Scientist explains the reason behind his bizarre lifestyle
Daily Mail online, 05/10/2016, Charles Foster, via The Conversation

Charles Foster, a research associate at the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics at Oxford University, was recently awarded an Ig Nobel Prize for his efforts to understand how animals live. In an article originally published on The Conversation, he explains the reasoning behind his decision to live as a badger and an otter, among others.Read the article in the Daily Mail online

September

Birth weight influenced by genes linked to disease risk, study reveals
The Guardian online, 28/09/2016, Nicola Davis

Birth weight of babies is influenced by genes that are also linked to the risk of developing a range of diseases later in life, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes, research has revealed. Scientists say that around a sixth of the variation in birth weight between babies is down to the baby’s genetics, with many of the genetic regions matching those linked to adult diseases and traits from high blood pressure to adult height. The findings, say researchers, strengthen the notion that it is not only environmental factors, such as nutrition of the foetus, that can affect a baby’s size and risk of developing conditions later in life. ‘What we have been able to show is that genetics are playing an important role here,’ said Mark McCarthy, co-author of the research, from the University of Oxford. ‘What is going on here is a very intricate mix of genetic and environmental factors playing through both the mother and the offspring which are connecting events in early life to events 50, 60 or 70 years later in the same individual.’Writing in the journal Nature, researchers from 117 institutions across 17 countries describe how they analysed genetic data from more than 153,000 individuals, including those of European, African American, Chinese and Moroccan ancestries, collected in 37 studies.

Read the article in the Guardian.com

Ig Nobel win for Alpine 'goat man'
BBC News 23/09/2016

Article features the Ig Nobel Biology Prize awarded jointly to Charles Foster, for living in the wild as, at different times, a badger, an otter, a deer, a fox, and a bird; and to Thomas Thwaites, for creating prosthetic extensions of his limbs that allowed him to move in the manner of, and spend time roaming hills in the company of, goats.

Read the article on the BBC News website


Briton who lived as a goat wins Ig Nobel prize

The Times online, 23/09/2016, Duncan Geddes

Charles Foster of Oxford University has shared the Ig Nobel prize in biology for his book, Being a Beast, which saw him take on the perspective of a badger, an otter, a fox, a red deer and a swift. Mr Foster said: "In an attempt to see woods as they really are without that distorting lens of vision and cognition, I tried to follow five non-human species. It increased my understanding of what their landscape is really like rather than landscapes coloured by our colonial impressions of what those landscapes should be like. It also generated in me a good deal of empathy for these animals and we can do with a little more of that." 

Read the article in The Times online


Shhhh! Companies would benefit from helping introverts to thrive

The Economist, Schumpeter Column, 10/09/16

Karl Moore, Associate Professor, Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, McGill University, has his research on Introverted Leaders discussed

Read the article in The Economist


World needs new approach on refugees, May tells UN

Financial Times, 21/09/2016, p.2

The prime minister has called for a ‘new approach’ to the refugee crisis. Alexander Betts, the Leopold Muller Professor of Forced Migration at Oxford University, comments on the Refugee Convention and the changing nature of today's crisis.

Read the article in the FT.com


US says it has assembled coalition to double resettlement of refugees

The Guardian, 21/09/2016, p.16, Patrick Kingsley

Alexander Betts, Head of Oxford University’s Refugee Studies Centre, comments on Barack Obama’s announcement that a US-led coalition of more than 30 countries has agreed a series of concrete responses to the refugee crisis.

Read the article in the Guardian.com

Radio: BBC World Service, Newshour
19/09/2016, 14:40

Professor Alexander Betts, Director of the Refugee Studies Centre at Oxford, is interviewed about the New York Declaration on Migrants and Refugees which was approved by world leaders meeting at UN General Assembly this week.


This week could offer a ray of hope to those stuck in camps and trapped in limbo

The Observer (Main), 18/09/2016, p.9, Alexander Betts

Alexander Betts, Director of the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford, looks ahead to the two highest-level global summits ever convened on refugees and mass migration which take place in New York this week.

Read the article in the Guardian.com

Maternal deaths worldwide drop by half, yet shocking disparities remain
The Guardian.com, 15/09/2016

Article quotes Stephen Kennedy, Head of the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at the University of Oxford, who says that access to adequate healthcare for mothers is a human rights issue: “Women should be as healthy as possible before pregnancy and have access to adequate health care when they are pregnant.”

Read the article in the Guardian.com

Shed pounds just by opening the window before bedtime
Daily Mail (Main), 10/09/2016, p.37, Fiona Macrae 

Speaking at the British Science Festival in Swansea, Professor Ashley Grossman of Oxford University discussed the link keeping cool and losing weight.

Read article in the Daily Mail Online

Radio: BBC World Service, World Business Report

05/09/2016, 23:39Alexander Betts, Professor of Migration at Oxford University, discusses Europe's ongoing migration crisis.

Listen again on the BBC website (06.23 on clock)


Science vs organic food: Is it really any better for you?
Daily Telegraph Australia, 03/09/2016, Wendy ZukermanArticle examining whether organic food is really better for us includes comment from Dr Kathryn Bradbury, a nutritional epidemiologist at Oxford University and a Research fellow at Green Templeton College

Read the Daily Telegraph article online


Radio: The Thought Show, BBC World Service
01/09/2016, 09:07 & 02/09/2016, 00:07Professor Carolyne Hoyle, Director of the Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford and a Green Templeton fellow, is interviewed about capital punishment and discusses the truth behind official statistics showing that half of the countries in the world have abolished its practice.

Listen again on the BBC website

August

Leadership Engagement Always Trumps Employee Engagement
Forbes.com, 31/08/2016

Green Templeton Associate Fellow Professor Karl Moore, Associate Professor in strategy and leadership at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and co-author Vincenzo Ciampi argue that the engagement of an organisation's executive team is the starting point and the most critical element in the engagement of any organisation, yet is often overlooked for a variety of reasons.

Read the Forbes.com article online

Radio: BBC Radio 4, More or Less
26/08/2016, 16:49 & 22:51; 29/08/2016, 03:50 & 15:51Professor Carolyn Hoyle, Director of the Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford and a Green Templeton Fellow, is interviewed about countries that have abolished the death penalty.
Radio: Managing generational difference: the Millennials
ABC Australia, 27/08/2016

Green Templeton Associate Fellow Professor Karl Moore, Associate Professor in strategy and leadership at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, is interviewed about his forthcoming book,  Leading, Managing, Working Effectively With Millennials and why young workers need to be managed differently.

Listen again on the ABC Australia website

Obesity and sugar
The Times, 24/08/2016, p.24 
Keith Frayn, Emeritus Professor of Human Metabolism at Oxford University and a Green Templeton Emeritus Fellow writes a letter commenting on the relationship between exercise and damage to joints.

English village leads a climate revolution
International New York Times (Main), 23/08/2016, p.1, Tatiana Schlossberg Article about the city of Ashton Hayes, where residents have banded together to cut greenhouse gas emissions, achieving a 24 percent cut in emissions over ten years. Sarah Darby, a researcher at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute, comments on the project. Read article in the New York Times

Radio: Your Money and Your Life, BBC Radio 4
20/08/2016, 12.26pm
Governing Body Fellow Stuart Gietel-Basten, professor of social policy at Oxford University, discusses the responsibilities of the state to society and the economy.

Alert on drug prices came two years ago
The Times, 16/08/2016, p.4, Billy Kenber
The views of GTC Emeritis Fellow John Wass, an endocrinologist and professor in Oxford, are noted as part of an article on the ‘excessive cost’ of some generic drugs.
Read article in The Times

Radio: BBC Radio 4, Could the Birmingham Six Happen Again?
09/08/2016, 20:31Green Templeton fellow Professor Carolyn Hoyle, Director of the Centre for Criminology at Oxford, comments on the Criminal Cases Review Commission. She says that it handles cases thoroughly and takes seriously its remit, but that it is quite slow.

Listen again on the BBC website [30:45 on the clock]
Disruptive Planning: Four Actions CEOs Must Take to Stay Ahead of Disruptive Forces
Forbes (USA), 09/08/2016, Karl MooreKarl Moore, an associate fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford, writes about the topic of 'disruption' in business.

Read the Forbes article online

Radio: The Compass, BBC World Service
07/08/2016, 10.07amAlexander Betts, Green Templeton fellow, director of the Refugee Studies Centre and professor of forced migration at Oxford University, discusses 'unprecedented' migration into Europe in the last year.

Listen again on the BBC website (c.01:00 on the clock)

The crisis of modern journalism
ABC online (Australia), 04/08/2016, Antony FunnellArticle about the decline of newspapers and online news quotes Dr David Levy, Green Templeton fellow and the Director of the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford, who says social media is rapidly becoming the main way people access information. The Institute produces an annual report on digital news trends, and this year's study found around 51% of respondents said they used social media to access news content, with around 12% claiming they use social media as their main source of news. Importantly, among the young - those aged 18 to 24 - the number was 28%.

Read the ABC online article
Radio: BBC Radio 4, Your Money and Your Life
03/08/2016, 15:04Green Templeton fellow Dr Stuart Gietel-Basten of Oxford University comments on how economic and demographic change have affected the patterns of our lives in terms of when people have children, work, marry and buy property.

Listen again on the BBC website
Radio: BBC World Service, The Compass
04/08/2016, 03:08Alexander Betts, Green Templeton fellow and Director of the Refugee Studies Centre and Professor of Forced Migration at Oxford University, takes part in a panel discussion on migration into Europe.

Listen again on the BBC website


The Director's Chair: Leadership Lessons from the Theatre
Forbes (USA), 03/08/2016, Karl Moore and Kathleen Garcia-ManjarresArticle about how business leaders can learn from actors is co-authored by Karl Moore, an associate fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford.

Read the Forbes article online

Radio: Your Money and Your Life, BBC Radio 4
30/07/2016, 12.06pmDr Stuart Gietel-Basten, a Green Templeton fellow, demographer and sociologist at the University of Oxford, comments on the change to the 'linear' pathway through life.

Listen again on the BBC website
Olympic Games Cost More Almost Every Time. That Could Change In Rio.
Huffington Post Canada, 30/07/2016, Jesse FerrerasThe cost of staging the Olympic Games grows almost every time they happen. But that may finally change in Rio, according to an Oxford working paper by researchers Bent Flyvbjerg, and Green Templeton alumni Alison Stewart (MSc Management Research 2008) and Alexander Budzier (DPhil Management Studies 2009).

Read the Huffington Post article online

July

Europe Should Adopt a Policy of Co-operation and Reciprocity to Tackle Refugee Crisis
Huffington Post UK, 28/07/2016, Mohsin TanveerArticle says that Green Templeton Research Fellow Professor Alexander Betts of Oxford University proposed an innovative approach towards addressing the refugee crisis - re-conceiving refugees as a development issue, as opposed to a humanitarian one. It says his proposal provides an alternative that fosters a policy of co-operation and reciprocity, thereby enabling maximum utilisation of human resources for two-tiered development: that of the refugees themselves and of the host country.

Read the Huffington Post article online
Will education change who my dyslexic son is?
Prospect Magazine, 25/07/2016

Charles Foster, Green Templeton Associate Fellow, writes about his son being diagnosed with dyslexia and the decision to send him to a specialist school. "What was his education trying to do to him? And in particular, would it, if it were successful, change Tom so profoundly that it'd be tantamount to killing him?"Read the Prospect Magazine article

Oxford masters student named top black student in UK
Oxford Mail online, 19/07/2016, Georgina CampbellNdakuna Fonso Amidou of Green Templeton College and the Oxford Internet Institute has been named the top black student in the UK. The postgraduate student grew up in a village outside Bameda, in the north-west region of Cameroon, where he did not start formal schooling until he was ten. Now in its eighth year, the Rare Rising Stars scheme celebrates the achievements of black students in the UK. The judging panel included David Lammy MP, Trevor Phillips OBE, Jean Tomlin OBE and Adrian Joseph of Google. Oxford University has featured prominently on the Rare Rising Stars list, with 14 entries and three winners over the past eight years.

Read the Oxford Mail article online
Turns out, obesity is three times deadlier for men than women: study
Deccan Chronicle (India), 19/07/2016, via ANIScientists say overweight people die one year earlier than expected and that moderately obese people die up to three years prematurely. Study co-author Green Templeton Fellow Professor Richard Peto is quoted.

Read the Deccan Times article online

'Being heavy cuts 3 years from life'
The Times of India, 16/07/2016, UnattributedScientists say overweight people die one year earlier than expected and that moderately obese people die up to three years prematurely. In the new study, which the authors say is the largest-ever such analysis, researchers sifted through data for nearly 4 million non-smoking adults in 32 countries published from 1970 to last year. They compared the risk of death to people's body mass index, or BMI. Overweight people lose a year of life on average and moderately overweight people lose 3 years, said Green Templeton Fellow Richard Peto of Oxford University, one of the study authors.

Read the Times of India article online

1 In 5 Premature Deaths Directly Linked To Obesity, Experts Warn
Huffington Post (USA), 18/07/2016, Michael LazarA study involving Oxford and published in The Lancet concludes that men of a healthy weight only had a 19% risk of death before age 70, whereas once obese, this risk jumped to 30%. For women of healthy weight, their risk of death before 70 was just 11%; but with obesity factored in, this rate climbed to 15%. Co-author and Green templeton fellow Professor Richard Peto is quoted in the article.

Read the Huffington Post article online

Digest This: Heavy People May Die Up to 3 Years Early
New York Times online, 14/07/2016, via Associated PressScientists say overweight people die one year earlier than expected and that moderately obese people die up to three years prematurely. Doctors have long warned that being overweight can lead to health complications including heart disease, stroke and cancer, and previous studies have already found that extra pounds can take years off your life, based mostly on data from Europe and North America. In the new study, which the authors say is the largest-ever such analysis, researchers sifted through data for nearly 4 million non-smoking adults in 32 countries published from 1970 to last year. They compared the risk of death to people's body mass index, or BMI, a measure of body fat that is calculated using height and weight. Overweight people lose a year of life on average and moderately overweight people lose 3 years, said Richard Peto of Oxford University, one of the study authors and a Fellow of Green Templeton College. A previous study found that being severely obese could cost as much as 8 years of life. The study also found that being obese is far more dangerous for men than for women.

Energy industry the perfect place for MBA graduates to 'get their hands dirty' 
Financial Times online, 11/07/2016, Stephen MorseGreen Templeton MBA student and FT blogger Stephen Morse writes about a recent Energy Perspectives Conference, hosted at the Saïd Business School. Includes comment from Chad Larson, an alumnus of the Saïd Business School and a co-founder and chief credit officer at M-KOPA Solar, based in Nairobi, Kenya, who said: "Because Oxford is a one-year programme, it draws an older crowd, and you have people who have fully established careers. You have people who are bringing industry perspectives...That's the great thing about Oxford's programme. I loved the college system and that you could mix with other graduate students who weren't in the business school - people into medieval history and philosophy."

Read the Finacial Times article online


Statin 'boost' for cancer survival
The Daily Mirror (Main), 09/07/2016, p.13, Andrew Gregory Academics from Aston University have said that taking statins to cut cholesterol may reduce the risk of dying from four common cancers. Other cancer experts, however, have cast doubts on a potential link. Green Templeton Fellow Professor Sir Richard Peto of Oxford University said: 'This suggestion of a protective effect of statins against death from cancer should not be taken seriously. We know from large-scale randomised trials that statins have little or no effect on cancer incidence or mortality.' 

Old Kedah civilisation should be included in history text books
New Straits Times (Malaysia), 05/07/2016Article on the Old Kedah civilisation notes that Oxford's Professor Stephen Oppenheimer, who is a Green Templeton Common Room Member was involved in the handing over of a plaque declaring Old Kedah to be the earliest civilisation in southeast Asia.

Read the New Straits Times article online


Disclose drug payments, NHS tells doctors

The Daily Telegraph (Main), 02/07/2016, p.8, Edward MalnickDrugs firms should stop paying doctors and health service officials who refuse to be named in a new transparency register, the NHS has warned. The database is a voluntary scheme by the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI), intended to show the payments and benefits-in-kind being given by drugs firms to doctors, nurses and NHS officials across the country. Inclusion in the register, however, is voluntary and hundreds of people have refused to have their names included.Ben Goldacre, Green Templeton Research Fellow and lead academic at the Evidence-Based Medicine Data Lab at Oxford University which analysed the figures, warned: "A financial conflict of interest does not necessarily mean that somebody is up to no good, but it does mean there are risks, and that they may be biased. That's why clearly declaring your conflicts matters, so that we can all judge for ourselves." He added: "Universal declaration is already the norm in countries such as the US. Leaving disclosure to individual doctors' personal discretion - or the moral compass of individual drug companies - is clearly not a serious solution."

Read the Daily Telegraph article online

Drug firms pay up to £100,000 for doctors' assessments
The Daily Telegraph (Main), 01/07/2016, p.12, Edward Malnick A new database reveals consultancy payments to medics from the pharmaceutical industry. According to the declared payments, the highest individual earner of fees and expenses from drugs companies last year was Ian Pavord, a respiratory medicine specialist at the Oxford University Hospitals Trust and a professor in the Nuffield Department of Medicine. Article quotes Ben Goldacre, GTC Research Fellow and lead academic at the Evidence-Based Medicine Data Lab at Oxford University, which analysed the figures: 'A financial conflict of interest does not necessarily mean that somebody is up to no good, but it does mean there are risks, and that they may be biased. That's why clearly declaring your conflicts matters, so that we can all judge for ourselves.' He explains that the individuals included in the database were those who have done the right thing by choosing to be transparent.

Read the Daily Telegraph article online

June

China's HNA Eagerly Seizes Political Opportunities For Expansion
Aviation Week & Space Technology (print and online), 10/06/2016, Perrett, Bradley.Green Templeton DPhil student Marc Szepan (DPhil Management Studies) is quoted in the leading aviation industry magazine regarding the approach of Chinese investors to cross-border post-acquisition integration."Stitching together a group of carriers for coordinated management may offer greater returns, but HNA seems not to have had much opportunity to do so internationally. Nor is there much reason to believe many of its other aviation-related assets will be welded into a tightly integrated global enterprise. That is consistent with the findings of former Lufthansa executive Marc Szepan, a doctoral candidate at the University of Oxford who is researching Chinese foreign direct investment. In general, says Szepan, Chinese companies recognize that the management teams of their foreign acquisitions are best placed to understand the local market and are thus left in control."Read the Aviation Week article onlineThe roles of parliament and the people after the referendum

The Guardian (Main), 28/06/2016, p.32Letter: Professor Benito Müller of the Environmental Change Institute and Professor Robert Walker of Green Templeton College write separately to call for parliamentary intervention following the EU referendum.Read the Guardian letter online
With refugees here to stay, hosts get help to make them an asset
Mail Online UK, via Reuters, 24/06/2016 Article on how Europe can support Syrian refugees includes comment from Alexander Betts, director of the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford and a Green Templeton Research Fellow.

Read the Daily Mail article online

Also:
With Refugees Here to Stay, Hosts Get Help to Make Them an Asset
New York Times online, via Reuters, 24/06/2016
With refugees here to stay, hosts get help to make them an asset

Reuters online, 24/06/2016

Read the Reuters online article
The Lop-sided Geography of Wikipedia
The Atlantic, 21/06/2016

An article about the barriers to the expnasion of the online encyclopedia features research on 'geographies of knowledge'  led by Green Templeton Research Fellow Dr Mark Graham of the Oxford Internet Institute.

Read The Atlantic article online


Radio: The History Hour, BBC World Service

19/06/2016, 10.39pmSir Richard Peto, Green Templeton College fellow, comments on Richard Doll's research into smoking and lung cancer.

Listen again on the BBC website


Radio: Outlook, BBC World Service

16/06/2016, 12:59 and 20:58An in-depth feature on Sir Richard Doll who discovered the link between smoking and cancer and who was the founding Warden of the former Green College (now Green Templeton). The programme uses archive interviews with him, as well as current interviews with Sir Richard Peto, Professor of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology at Oxford University, who worked with Professor Doll when Doll was Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford in the late 1960s. Professor Peto, who is a GTC fellow, estimates that this century alone, smoking will cause a billion deaths.

Listen again on the BBC website (Around 44:36 on the clock)
Ben Goldacre: 'Evidence-based research should play a larger role in teacher training'
Times Education Supplement online, 16/06/2016, UnattributedDr Ben Goldacre, senior clinical research fellow at the University of Oxford and a Research fellow at Green Templeton College, has told the TES that evidence-based research should be a key part of initial teacher training and ongoing CPD. He adds that randomised trials are valuable in measuring whether something works.

Read the TES article online

Honorary doctorate for Professor Sir Richard Peto
Times Higher Education, 16/06/2016, p.23Sir Richard Peto, professor of medical statistics and epidemiology at the University of Oxford and a Green Templeton fellow, has been made an honorary doctor of medicine at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden.

Read the THE article online

Radio: SWR2
Merkel im Reich der Mitte: Der Streit um die Annerkung Chinas als Marktwirtschaft" (Chancellor Merkel in the Middle Kingdom: The Dispute over China's Recognition as a Market Economy)
14/06/2016Green Templeton student Marc Szepan (DPhil Management Studies) is interviewed about China's recognition as a market economy and market access for foreign companies in China.Listen to the interview online (in German) (7.42 minutes)
China should continue to invest in science and technology: Expert
CHINAdaily, 10/06/2016, Amy HeInterview with Professor Xiaolan Fu, Director of the Technology and Management Centre for Development at Oxford University, in which she discusses the development of the Chinese economy.

Read the China Daily article online
TV: BBC 2, Food Detectives
06/06/2016, 08:06Dr Kathryn Bradbury, Girdlers Fellow at Green Templeton College and an expert in how cancer affects populations, discusses the link between how much processed meat we consume and bowel cancer.

Find out more on the BBC website
Radio: BBC Radio 4, Today
06/06/2016, 08:06Professor Dame Valerie Beral, Director of the Cancer Epidemiology Unit at Oxford and a Green Templeton Fellow, discusses new North American research which has found that taking hormonal drugs for up to ten years can reduce the risk of breast cancers returning by one third.
Radio: BBC Radio 4, Today
06/06/2016, 07:13Professor Dame Valerie Beral of the University of Oxford, who is a GTC Fellow, discusses a new landmark study which has found that taking hormonal drugs for up to 10 years can reduce the risk of breast cancers returning by one third.

Listen again on the BBC website (1:13:30 on the clock)
Google, Canadian media outlets launch AMP websites
CBC, 02/06/2016Google Canada and major Canadian publishers are launching Accelerated Mobile Pages or AMP - websites built using open-source rules and tools developed by Google with the promise that they will load much faster and eat up far less of your data on a mobile device. Google AMP will enable publishers to use paywalls and subscriptions to generate revenue - something that isn't possible with Facebook Instant Articles, says Rasmus Neilsen, director of research for the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at Oxford University and a GTC Visiting Fellow.

Read the CBC news article online

May

Digital work marketplaces impose a new balance of power
New Internationalist, 25/05/2016,Mark Graham

Green Templeton College Associate Fellow Mark Graham blogs about the future of work and working conditions in the digital age and how best to make those conditions better. 

Read full article online

How rare are bright blue lobsters?
BBC News online, 25/05/2016

GTC Senior Visiting Research Fellow Andrew Parker from Oxford’s Department of Zoology gives his view on the odds of catching a bright blue lobster.

Read article in the BBC News Online


The big beasts of news fight back, with a little help from the internet
The Sunday Times, 22/05/2016, p.29, John Arlidge 

Article on the relationship between traditional news media and technology includes comment from Rasmus Nielsen, Green Templeton Visiting Fellow and director of research at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.

Read article online

Why is Google dumbing down our quest for knowledge?
Toronto Star Online (Canada), 13/05/2016, Unattributed Article on Google's 'knowledge panels' mentions research by Green Templeton Research Fellow Mark Graham and Heather Ford at the Oxford Internet Institute which analysed how the city of Jerusalem was represented both on Wikipedia and in Google knowledge panels: 'They found that while Wikipedia may explain the city's contested geopolitical status in enormous depth - that portion runs to almost 1,500 words - the nuance was jettisoned completely when the article was deboned and ingested by Google.' Professor Graham said: "Google, through its data and algorithms, now controls how we interact with many facets of the cities we live in. So we should be asking whether we are happy ceding decisions about how we live our everyday lives to them."

Read the Toronto Star article online

Strategy specialists forced to amend their offering
Financial Times online, 10/05/2016 

GTC Governing Body Fellow Tim Morris, Professor of Management Studies at the Saïd Business School, writes on the evolution of strategy consulting.

Read article in the Financial Times online

Using scenarios to reframe challenges unlocks opportunities
Business Standard India, 08/05/2016
  
An article about a book by Rafael Ramirez, a Green Templeton Fellow and senior fellow in strategy at Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and Angela Wilkinson, an Associate Fellow at the School. The book says using scenarios to reframe and re-perceive challenges can offer a better approach to forming strategy than evidence-based planning, risk management and projection.Read the Business Standard Indai article online

Research on university leadership is ‘theoretically weak’
Times Higher Education, 05/05/2015, p.10, Jack Grove

Current literature on how to improve university leadership is ‘small-scale, fragmented and often theoretically weak,’ according to a study led by Professor Sue Dopson of the University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School. The report concludes there are few useful studies to illustrate how well UK universities are doing at training and supporting the next generation of university leaders.

Read in Times Higher Education online

An elective in Africa: part one
Financial Times online, 29/04/2016, Stephen MorseStephen Morse, a Green Templeton MBA student at the Saïd Business School, writes about his international elective, which was spent studying business in Johannesburg: "Myself and 41 other MBA students are immersed in all things Africa. We are led by Mthuli Ncube, professor of public policy at Oxford’s Blavatnik School of Government. As a former chief economist and vice-president of the African Development Bank, Professor Ncube is one of the most connected men on the continent."

Read Stephen Robert Morse's FT blog online
April

Only 53% of people hospitalised due to self-harm get mental health assessment
Mail Online UK, 28/04/2016Little more than half of people hospitalised by incidents of self-harm receive a mental health assessment afterwards, despite being at a higher risk of suicide, a new study has revealed. The Multicentre Study of Self-harm in England looked at more than 84,000 cases over 12 years and found that a "psychosocial assessment" by specialist staff occurred in 53.2% of them. This is despite guidelines issued by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in 2004 saying they should be given in all cases. Writing in the online journal BMJ Open, the team led by Professor Keith Hawton, a Green Templeton Governing Body Fellow, said people who "self-injured" were less likely, compared to those "self-poisoning" by taking overdoses, to receive a mental health assessment.

Read the Mail Online articleAn elective in Africa: part one
Financial Times online, 29/04/2016, Stephen MorseGreen Templeton and Saïd Business School MBA student Stephen Morse writes for the FT MBA blog.

Read the FT MBA blog post

Sur Google Maps, on peut évaluer les centres de rétention comme des parcs
Motherboard, 25/04/2016, Lilas GuevaraGreen Templeton Research Fellow Mark Graham, Director of Research at the Oxford Internet Institute, is quoted in an online article about the inclusion of prisons and detention centres in Google Maps and Street View, making visible places whose operation remains largely opaque to the average citizen. Features in Google Maps, such as comments, provide a new virtual space, making them more visible, "[These locations] are made of bricks and mortar but also information," argues Graham who works on inequalities in current Google Map coverage..

Read the Motherboard article online (in French)

Lord Walton of Detchant
The Times, 28/04/2016, p.59, UnattributedObituary of neurologist Lord Walton of Detchant, a former warden of Green College, Oxford.

Read the Times article online (subscribers only)

Second child more about couples' aspirations 
China Daily, 19/04/2016, Stuart Basten Article on the one-child policy by Stuart Basten, Green Templeton Governing Body fellow and associate professor of social policy at Oxford University's Department of Social Policy and Intervention.

Read the China Daily article online

New website provides platform for female Oxford University scientists
Oxford Mail online, 19/04/2016, Hannah Somerville 

Female scientists at Oxford University are being put in the spotlight on a new website to encourage others to follow in their footsteps. The new site, www.womeninscience.ox.ac.uk, delves into the experiences of successful scientists who studied at the university. It features a collection of video interviews with 39 women at various points in their careers to tell the story of an ongoing culture shift for women in the field. Those interviewed, who hail from departments including biochemistry, computing and plant sciences, as well as medicine, say that discrimination is rarely experienced. Sue Ziebland, Professor of Medical Sociology at the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, is quoted.

Read article in Oxford Mail Online

Radio: BBC Radio 5 Live, Up All Night
19/04/2016, 02:03 (around 1:02 on the click)

Professor Alex Betts, Director of the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford, gives his response to the news that hundreds of migrants drowned when their boat capsized in the Mediterranean when they were fleeing from Libya to Italy.

Listen online

Radio: BBC Radio5, Phil Williams
18/04/2016, 22:53Professor Alex Betts, Director of the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford, comments following reports that hundreds of migrants may have drowned when their boat capsized in the Mediterranean.

Xi Jinping flirts with danger in turn to ideology
South China Morning Post (Hong Kong), 12/04/2016, p.12, Stein Ringen

Stein Ringen, GTC Fellow and emeritus professor at the University of Oxford, writes about the differences between Chinese leader Xi Jinping and his predecessors.


Top scientist warns that cloning could lead to illegal black market
Daily Express online, 12/04/2016, Sean MartinArticle on cloning developments includes comment from Dr Charles Foster, a Fellow of Green Templeton College and a Research Associate at the University of Oxford. Dr Foster says now that scientists can clone human embryos, but it is illegal to do so in most countries, a black market around therapeutic cloning could develop.

Read the Daily Express article online

Our city scientists in the race to beat Zika virus before Rio
Oxford Mail, 05/04/2016, p.12, Andy FfrenchBrazilian health leaders are desperate to prevent the spread of the Zika virus during the Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games in August. There's good reason for suspecting the virus could be spread at a major sporting occasion - one theory discussed by Oxford researchers involves the virus first being introduced during the Confederations Cup. Now research is under way in Oxford to try to tackle the threat, with University teams starting three new projects. Academics are trying to establish links between the virus and the birth defect microcephaly, an abnormal smallness of the head, and Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a rare disease of the nervous system. And one Oxfordshire biotech company is to play a major role in the global fight to diagnose and prevent the spread of the virus.

Professor Stephen Kennedy, a Green Templeton Governing Body Fellow based in the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, will create an online facility to share images of foetal and newborn heads to try to understand the extent of the problem of babies being born with microcephaly.

Oxford University students volunteer at Calais ‘jungle’
BBC News online, 04/04/2016

Video feature on Calais trip in which GTC student Jack O'Sullivan helped plan. 

Watch on BBC Online

I doped 150 sports stars
The Sunday Times (Main), 03/04/2016, p.7, Jonathan Calvert, George Arbuthnott and David Collins A doctor has boasted of helping elite cricketers, footballers and other athletes to cheat. Mark Bonar was recorded saying he treated 150 elite sportsmen - including many household names - with secret 'programmes' of banned performance-enhancing drugs. To trap Bonar, The Sunday Times recruited an aspiring Olympic runner who was willing to help and made an appointment with Bonar, who tested the athlete's blood and prescribed him the thyroid medication Levothyroxine, along with prescriptions for two banned performance enhancing drugs: Genotropin (human growth hormone) and DHEA (a steroid hormone). The paper later showed the runner's blood test from the appointment to Ashley Grossman, Green Templeton Associate Fellow and professor of endocrinology at Oxford University, who said the runner's thyroid levels were, if anything, slightly high and did not require boosting, a testosterone shot was 'completely inappropriate' and there was no medical reason to prescribe the growth hormone. Grossman warned that all the drugs had side effects. He said the growth hormone could cause high blood pressure and diabetes, and even weaken the heart muscles long-term; the thyroid drug places extra strain on his heart and the testosterone thickens the blood, increasing the risk of a stroke.

Read the Sunday Times article online (subscription needed)
Savvy millennials reveal GMAT strategies
Financial Times (Main), 04/04/2016, p.12, Jonathan MoulesAn article on the GMAT entry test for MBA courses includes comment from Green Templeton and Saïd Business School student Stephen Morse who says that the GMAT is a coveted conversation starter among the pre-business school set. But once you get into school nobody cares about this number anymore.

Read the Financial Times article online
March

Leading the way in war on Zika
Oxford Times, 31/03/2016, p.61, Andrew French

A variety of research and action is underway in Oxfordshire to try to tackle the Zika virus, which has been linked to the birth deformity microcephaly – where babies are born with small heads and underdeveloped brains. The article mentions that researchers at Oxford University are starting three new projects as part of the drive to tackle the virus. GTC Governing Body Fellow, Professor Stephen Kennedy of the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology will create an online facility to share images of fetal and newborn heads to try to understand the extent of the problem of babies being born with microcephaly. Professor Zoltan Molnar, of the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, is carrying out research in mice to understand at the cellular level how Zika causes microcephaly. And Dr George Warmwe, from the Jenner Institute at the Nuffield Department of Medicine, is studying how the virus is spread. 

For my next trick...
The Economist, 26/03/2016, p.82 

A new project at the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine at Oxford University, COMPare, seeks to reduce the practice of “outcome switching” in clinical trials. Outcome switching is a procedure in which researchers change the questions that a study is designed to answer, when the study is already partly under way. This can lead to important data being ignored, or variables manipulated to show correlations which are not statistically significant. As part of the COMPare project, Oxford researchers have investigated the scale of this practice and contacted scientific journals pointing out the inconsistencies they have found. GTC Research Fellow, Ben Goldacre, who is leading the project, comments on the responses they have received: “When you provoke the system, the responses you get tell you a lot about how the system works. But we’re not doing this to be provocative and snide, we’re doing it to understand the pathology.”

Read in The Economist Online

As More Work Moves Online, The Threat of 'Digital Sweatshops' Looms
VICE Motherboard, 22/03/2016

Green Templeton Research Fellow, Dr Mark Graham of the Oxford Internet Instutute raises concerns about the possibility of 'digital sweatshops' as we move into an era of a digital future of  work. 

Read the VICE Motherboard article online

Why large parts of the Internet have suddenly vanished for millions of users
Quartz

Dr Mark Graham, Green Templeton Research Fellow based at the Oxford Internet Institute, comments on sanctions-linked bans on access to digital services, in particular, cloud provision. "Data is always inherently in, or moving through, real or geographic places. We often assume away those geographies-precisely because of metaphors like the cloud-and assume that geography no longer matters once we're online," he says.Read the Quartz article online

What menopausal women should know ...
The Daily Mirror, 18/03/2016, p.40A discussion of HRT includes comment from Professor Valerie Beral of Oxford University, a Green Templeton Governing Body Fellow, who says that around one million women receive HRT and this group would expect to experience an extra 10,000 breast and 1,000 ovarian cancers compared to women not taking hormones. 

Radio: BBC World Service, Health Check 
09/03/2016, 20:40, 03:40

GTC Governing Body Fellow and Professor Keith Hawton, Director of the Centre for Suicide Research at Oxford University, comments on how to evaluate the difference suicide prevention campaigns can make.

Listen on BBC Radio

Radio: BBC Radio5, 5 Live Breakfast
07/03/2016, 07:39Professor Alex Betts of the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford and a Green Templeton Research Fellow, discusses migration to Europe ahead of Monday's emergency EU summit with Turkey on how to deal with the migrant crisis.

Listen again on the BBC website (01.39.31 on clock)
3.5m health campaign that asks the public if they feel 'knackered, fat and flabby' is blasted as 'patronising and a waste of taxpayers' money'
Daily Mail online, 07/03/2016, Sophie BorlandArticle on a new health campaign aimed at middle-aged Brits includes a quote from Professor Sir Muir Gray, an expert in public health from Oxford University and a Green Templeton Emeritus Fellow.

Read the Daily Mail article online

NHS splurges £3.5m on ads telling middle aged to eat less and run more
Daily Mail, 07/03/2016, p.12, Sophie Borland A new NHS campaign is targeting the middle aged. Article quotes Professor Sir Muir Gray, a Green Templeton Emeritus Fellow and an expert in public health from Oxford University, who advised on this latest campaign.

Read the Daily Mail article online
Radio: Today, BBC Radio 4
04/03/2016, 8.39amTrudie Lang, professor of global health research at the Centre for Tropical Medicine at Oxford University and a Green Templeton Senior Research Fellow, discusses progress in the development of a vaccine against the Zika virus. She says: "We need vaccines designed, which is what they are doing now. They need testing in phase one then they need testing in the field. Then they need to be manufactured and we need to make sure that they are priced and appropriate to use globally. All of that needs coordination and to be happening all at once rather than one at a time."

Listen on the BBC website (c.2:39:00 on the clock)
Radio: The World Tonight, BBC Radio 4

03/03/2016, 22:10Professor Alexander Betts, Director of the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford and a Green Templeton Research Fellow, is interviewed about European Council President Donald Tusk warning illegal economic migrants not to come to Europe.Listen again on the BBC website (Around 9:59 on the clock)
TED 2016: 'There must be another way' to solve world's problems
CBC News online (Canada), 19/02/2016Oxford refugee researcher and Green Templeton Research Fellow Alexander Betts received a standing ovation for a twenty-minute TED talk in Vancouver, in which he outlined a four-point plan to overhaul a decades-old approach to international migration.  "What are we doing? How has the situation come to this that we've adopted such an inhumane response to a humanitarian crisis?" he asked the crowd.

Read the CBS News online article

February

The fantastic Mr Badger
The Observer (The New Review), 14/02/2016, p.33, Alex Preston Review of a new book, Being A Beast, by Charles Foster, an expert in medical law at Oxford University and a Green Templeton Associate Fellow. The book follows his attempts to live like different animals in the English countryside.

Read the Observer review online

Marginal benefits
The Economist online, 11/02/2016An article on Britain's policy of sending asylum seekers to a few, poor, areas of the country, includes comment from Alexander Betts of Oxford University. He suggests the Home Office could start placing asylum-seekers according to skills shortages in local areas.

Read the Economist article online
World's top scientists pledge to share all findings to fight Zika
New Straits Times online, 11/02/2016, Unattributed Thirty of the world's leading scientific research institutions, journals and funders have pledged to share for free all data and expertise on Zika to speed up the fight against an outbreak of the viral disease spreading across the Americas. Trudie Lang, a professor and director of the Global Health Network at Oxford University comments on the agreement, saying that if data is shared more, questions can be answered faster. She adds that it is excellent to see the lessons learnt from Ebola being put into place.

Read the New Straits Times article online

Disruption to women's lives caused by periods needs more research
The Guardian online, 10/02/2016, Kate HodalMillions of girls and women avoid school and work while they are menstruating because of stigma and inadequate hygiene, yet too little research has been done to assess the effectiveness of programmes designed to address the problem, says an Oxford University study. Programmes to support menstruating women vary wildly, with no comprehensive review of what works best or why. As a result, governments, international organisations and local charities may be investing funds and resources in programmes that could be more efficient, according to the paper published on Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE. The co-authors GTC student Julie Hennegan (DPhil Social Intervention) and GTC Fellow Paul Montgomery from the Centre for Evidence-Based Intervention are quoted.

Read the Guardian article online
Total wipeout
The Guardian (G2), 11/02/2016, p.6, Archie Bland Article looking at the spread of the mosquito-borne Zika virus and discussions about whether it would be ethical and desirable to eliminate mosquitoes from the planet or genetically modify certain species to be barren. Professor Trudie Lang, a senior research fellow at Green Templeton College and head of the Global Health Network, discusses how to combat viruses like Zika. 'There's this incredible study on foetal scans and baby measurements,' Lang explains, 'which will mean that at least people can interpret the scans properly; if the problem is with foetal development then we have to know how that occurs. But these kinds of big studies are really underfunded, and because this kind of research doesn't get any attention, that's why we are where we are with Zika. The really hi-tech, GM stuff - bring it on. Marvellous. It gets people excited, it gets the [research] papers in Nature. But the normal, everyday stuff - the pragmatic, frontline research - can make some of the biggest differences. And it's very, very difficult to get funding to support research-capacity development.'

Read the Guardian article online
World's top scientists pledge to share all findings to fight Zika
Reuters, 10/02/2016, Kate Kelland Thirty of the world's leading scientific research institutions, journals and funders have pledged to share for free all data and expertise on Zika to speed up the fight against an outbreak of the viral disease spreading across the Americas. 'The arguments for sharing data and the consequences of not doing so (have been) ... thrown into stark relief by the Ebola and Zika outbreaks,' said a statement issued by signatories from around the world.
Trudie Lang, a professor and director of the Global Health Network at Britain's Oxford University, said that if data is shared more, 'questions can be answered faster'.
'This agreement is a very important step...and it is excellent to see the lessons we learnt from Ebola being put into place,' she said.

Read the Reuters article online

UK steps up measures to curb Zika transmission risk
Xinhua (China), 09/02/2016, UnattributedArticle on the race to study and fight the Zika virus notes that researchers from institutes and universities in Britain and other countries are working with their counterparts in the Americas through online platforms such as the Global Health Network. The network is an online forum to help clinical researchers with trial design, methods, interpretation of regulations, and general operations. The network has already established a website dedicated to the study of Zika virus. "There needs to be international collaboration and sharing of research methods and skills to help these studies (of Zika) begin as quickly as possible," said Professor Trudie Lang from the University of Oxford, who leads the Global Health Network and is a GTC Senior Research Fellow."Data collected by any one group should be taking the same measurements and making the same assessments, so that it can be pooled together with other results to give strong evidence and generate answers more quickly. This needs coordination and open access to research tools and documents," said Professor Lang. 

Read the Xinhua (China) article online
what's the truth?
The Sunday Telegraph (Stella), 07/02/2016, p.64, Anna Magee Feature looking at the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Last November, the National Institute of Clinical Excellence issued guidelines on menopause, encouraging doctors to offer patients HRT while making clear the risks involved. Article notes that the Million Women Study (MWS) at Oxford University identified an increased breast cancer risk in women prescribed HRT, and includes comment from Professor Klim McPherson, professor of public health epidemiology at Oxford, who worked on the Million Women Study, and from GTC Senior Research Fellow Professor Ashley Grossman, professor of endocrinology at Oxford University.

Read the Stella article online


Radio: BBC Radio Oxford, Howard Bentham
08/02/2016, 09:04BBC Radio Oxford visits the Radcliffe Meteorological Station at Green Templeton College to talk to Oxford DPhil student Amy Creese, who takes daily weather measurements at the Radcliffe Observatory. The records from the station form part of the longest running weather records in the UK.

Listen again on the BBC website (02.20.20 on clock)

The battle over the gender price gap
BBC online, 05/02/2016An article on the 'pink tax' - the fact that prices for women's products are routinely higher than those of similar products for men - quotes Prof Nancy Puccinelli, a consumer psychologist at Oxford University who says that her research suggests that women are actually much more careful shoppers than men, better able to scrutinise adverts and pricing gimmicks. She wonders if women are perceiving more value in the more expensive products, noting that for men razors are functional, whereas women may perceive hair removal as more hedonistic, more about self-care, and be more willing to pay more. She add that there could also be environmental factors hindering their choices, like product placement in the store, explaining that if products are separated into male and female sections far away from each other it's harder to scrutinise prices.

Read the BBC News article online

‘If they cut food coupons we'll have to think of going to Europe’
The Guardian, 04/02/2016, p.14, Patrick Kingsley

Article about the plight of Syrian refugees in Jordan, most of whom do not have the right to work and subsist on illegal earnings and UN food coupons. In exchange for $1.6bn (£1.1bn) in aid, Jordan’s prime minister, Abdullah Ensour, claims he could eventually give 150,000 Syrians access to legal work. The central plank of his plan involves the creation of five new ‘special economic zones’: industrial parks bestowed with low export tariffs to Europe – where between 50-70% of jobs would be given to Syrians, and the remainder to Jordanians. ‘Creating an economic zone [for Syrians] is a pragmatic second-best solution,’ says GTC Research Fellow Alexander Betts, the head of Oxford University’s Refugee Studies Centre, who helped brainstorm and promote the concept of Jordanian economic zones. ‘The real solution is for refugees to have full access to work in host countries – but politically and pragmatically there are many barriers to that.’

Read article in The Guardian

Being a Beast by Charles Foster
The Guardian, 03/02/2016, Patrick Barkham

Guardian writer, Patrick Barkham, writes a glowing review for GTC Associate Fellow Charles Foster's new book. 'Illuminating and unfailingly entertaining, this book is a tour de force of modern nature writing, and shows us how to better love the world beyond ourselves.Read full review in The Guardian

Radio: BBC Radio London, JoAnne Good
02/02/2016, 13:12Charles Foster, an Associate Fellow of Green Templeton College, is interviewed about his new book Being a Beast.
Two-child policy alone can't fix aging problem
China Daily, 02/02/2016, Stuart Gietel-BastenStuart Gietel-Basten, Associate Professor in Social Policy at the University of Oxford and a Governing Body Fellow of Green Templeton College, writes about China's introduction of a two-child policy.Read the China Daily article online


Radio: BBC Radio London, Paul Ross
03/02/2016, 04:02Professor Trudie Lang. GTC Senior Research Fellow, comments on Zika in the light of news that a person in the US may have contracted the disease by sexual transmission. She says that most transmission occurs through mosquito bites but the situation requires far more research.

Listen again on the BBC website (1:48 on the clock)
Radio: BBC Radio4, Woman's Hour
01/02/2016, 10:09Trudie Lang, Senior Research fellow at GTC and Professor of Global Health at the University of Oxford, takes part in a discussion about how women in Brazil are coping with the Zika virus.

Listen again on the BBC websiteJanuaryTV: Amanpour, CNN
27/01/2016, 22:06Professor Alexander Betts, GTC Research fellow and Director of the Refugee Studies Centre at Oxford University, is interviewed about detention centres for refugees in Australia.

Watch the CNN news item
How trade can offer Syrian refugees a route to a better future - at home
The Times, 30/01/2016, p.53, Philip Aldrick Article on ways to help refugees in the Zaatari camp in Jordan to thrive economically notes the views of the Oxford academics Stefan Dercon, Paul Collier and GTC Research Fellow Alexander Betts.

Read the Times article online (subscription only)
How to be a beast. Step one, eat worms
The Times, 30/01/2016, Saturday Review, p.13, Damian Whitworth Review of a new book, Being A Beast, by Charles Foster, an expert in medical law at Oxford University and a GTC Associate Fellow. The book follows his attempts to live like different animals in the English countryside.

Read the Times article online (subscription only)

10 things you need to know today: January 26, 2016
The Week (USA), 26/01/2016, Harold MaassThe mosquito-borne Zika virus will probably spread to every country in the Americas except Canada and Chile, the World Health Organization said on Monday. Zika, which has previously occurred in parts of Africa, south-east Asia and the Pacific Islands, has been linked to brain damage in thousands of babies in Brazil. It has not yet been reported in the continental US. 'We've got no drugs and we've got no vaccines,' said Trudie Lang, Professor of Global Health at the University of Oxford. 'It's a case of deja vu because that's exactly what we were saying with Ebola.'

Read The Week article online

Radio: BBC World Service, World Update
25/01/2016, 10:36Trudie Lang, Professor of Global Health at Oxford University and GTC Senior Research Fellow, discusses the need for a rapid research response to the dramatic increase in cases of the mosquito-borne disease, Zika, and the parallel increase in cases of microcephaly in newborns. The World Health Organisation yesterday warned that the disease is likely to spread to almost every country in South, Central and North America.

Listen again on the BBC websiteAlso with comment from Professor Lang:
TV: BBC One, News at Ten
25/01/2016, 22:08Professor Trudie Lang is interviewed about the emergence of Zika.

Watch again on BBC iPlayer (08.08 on clock)

TV: BBC World News, BBC World News
23/01/2016, 11:08A report on the Zika virus outbreak in South America includes an interview with GTC Senior Research Fellow Professor Trudie Lang from Tropical Medicine in the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine. She explains that staff at Oxford University are supporting South American medics to lead a research response to the outbreak.
Beastie boys
Evening Standard, 22/01/2016, p.20, David SextonFeature on what is described as 'wilderness porn' discusses a new book by Oxford don and GTC Associate Fellow Charles Foster, Being A Beast, in which he chronicles his attempts to live as a badger, an otter, an urban fox, a red deer and a swift.

Read the Evening Standard article onlineAlso:
Fantastic Mr Fox
The Guardian (Weekend Magazine), 23/01/2016, p.28Read the Guardian article online

Blockchain raises fundamental questions
Financial Times online, 20/01/2016An article on the potential for blockchain technology in financial services says that some beliefs about the technology may be fallacious, such as to believe that it is a defence against government, rather than an enabler of it. Noting that if a society adopts a single system of digital money, where transactions are recorded on a single database, it is likely governments will successfully attempt to control it, it quotes Ben Zevenbergen, Green Templeton DPhil student and a researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute who explains that it is a good method for surveillance of cash transactions, but he adds: 'the question is, do you want this surveillance?'

Blockchain raises fundamental questions

New levels of anxiety over refugees in Europe
International New York Times, 13/01/2016, p.1, Jim Yardley

Article over Europe’s attitude to migration includes comment from Alexander Betts, director of the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford.

Read article in the New York Times

Healthier living would save NHS, says ex-boss

Daily Mail (Main), 11/01/2016, p.10, Colin Fernandez

An article on comments by ex-NHS England chief executive David Nicholson who said that people need to take more responsibility for their own health to reduce the cost to the NHS for treating preventable diseases, a cost expected to increase by £5 billion a year until 2018. It contains comment from Trisha Greenhalgh, Green Templeton Senior Research Fellow and professor of primary care health sciences at Oxford University, who says that the survival of the NHS as we know it depends on a 'fully engaged' scenario in which all or most of the population live healthier lifestyles and take action to prevent and self-manage the chronic diseases that account for most of healthcare costs in this country. She adds that we need to recognise the influence of societal factors.

Read the Daily Mail article online
Statins can cause heart disease
The Sunday Express (Main), 10/01/2016, p.1, Lucy JohnstonResearchers from Nagoya City University in Japan have said that people who take statins may be at greater risk if heart problems. Article notes the views of Professor Sir Rory Collins of the University of Oxford, Senior Visiting Research fellow at Green Templeton College, who has warned that overstating concerns about statins could "cause very large numbers of unnecessary deaths from heart attacks and stroke".

Read the Sunday Express article online

January

Emerging into a big issue
Eastern Eye, 30/01/2015, p.14 Fifty leading international policy experts and practitioners have called for radical change in the policies and priorities in emerging markets at the Emerging Markets Symposium held at Green Templeton College, Oxford, earlier this month. Experts said that increased longevity will offer new opportunities for economic growth but only if political and cultural institutions adapt to meet the challenges an ageing population. 

Chemicals in lipstick linked to early menopause
The Times, 29/01/2015, p.24, Tom WhippleAshley Grossman, GTC Senior Research Fellow and professor of endocrinology at Oxford University, comments on research from Washington University which suggests that women with the highest levels of endocrine disruptors are likely to start the menopause earlier.

Read the Times article onlineAlso:
Could your make-up put you at risk of early menopause? Chemicals in lipstick, face cream and nail varnish can speed up the process by four years, study finds
Mail Online, 28/01/2015, Lizzie ParryRead the Mail Online article Online article

City sees sunniest December since records began
Oxford Mail, p.5, 24/01/2015Oxford University researchers have found that December was the sunniest in Oxford since records began in 1881. Nearly 97 hours of sunshine were recorded for the month by observers from Oxford University's Radcliffe Meteorological Station which is based in the gardens at GTC - almost twice as much as the December average of 49 hours. Dr Ian Ashpole, observer for the Radcliffe Meteorological Station from the university's School of Geography and Environment said: 'This December record is just another chapter from the extraordinary weather story of 2014. Overall it was the warmest since 1815, and the winter months December to February were the wettest in 248 years.'

Read the Oxford Mail article onlineImprovisation puts a spring in the step of plodding managers
Financial Times, 26/01/2015, p.12, Emma De VitaInstead of wasting time and effort trying to control the uncontrollable, improvise, suggests GTC Associate Fellow Robert Poynton, of Saïd Business School and co-founder of On Your Feet, a consultancy that transposes methods from improvisational theatre to business. 'Improvisation is not making it up on the spur of the moment, it's not winging it,' he says. Nor do you have to be an acting genius to become an effective improviser. Instead, it comes down to your ability to view everything as an 'offer' - something that can be used to good effect. Mr Poynton has created games that executives use to strengthen their improvisational muscles. At improvisation's core is being responsive to unexpected situations, letting go of expectations and using every skill to find a solution.

Read the FT article onlineWhy we're obsessed with the cult of busy
Brisbane Courier-Mail (Australia), via The Sunday Telegraph, 23/01/2015, Nicole Mowbray Article on how busy people feel they are includes comment from Ashley Grossman, GTC Senior Research Fellow and Professor of Endocrinology at Oxford University, on the stress hormone cortisol and its effect on our bodies.

Read the Brisbane Courier-Mail article online
Leading cos transforming to drive innovation, growth: Report
Business Standard India, 22/01/2015, via Press Trust of India
Leading companies around the world are transforming themselves with a purpose to drive innovation and growth, new research by EY and Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, has found. The research highlighted a shift toward "purpose-led" transformation.  "We have noticed from a number of conversations with CEOs and senior leaders that defining and implementing 'purpose' is becoming increasingly important to them," Saïd Business School Associate Dean of Executive Education and GTC Fellow Andrew White said.

Read the Business Standard India article online
Radio: BBC Radio Oxford, David Prever
21/01/2015, 16:34Observers from Oxford University's Radcliffe Meteorological Observatory, which is based in the garden at Green Templeton College, have determined that December 2014 was Oxford's sunniest December on record.

Listen again on the BBC website (circa 00:34 on the clock)


Sad movies, happy ads
Boston Globe, 11/01/2015, Kevin Lewis

Short article about the dangers for advertisers scheduling an upbeat television advert during a sad or relaxing drama, cites research carried out by Dr Nancy Puccinelli, GTC Associate Fellow and Associate Professor at the Said Business School.

Read the Boston Globe article onlineRead the Boston Globe article online
Don't blame the facilitator
Times Higher Education, 15/01/2015, p28, Sue ShepherdOpinion piece on the use of headhunters in making senior appointments in Higher Education. Professor Sir David Watson, Principal of Green Templeton College, is quoted as saying that headhunters help create a "competitive waiting room" that is less and less diverse.

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Radio: Today, BBC Radio 4
14/01/2015, 07:53Professor Trudy Lang of the Centre for Tropical Medicine at the University of Oxford comments on the lessons to be learned from the Ebola outbreak.

Gut bacteria, prebiotics and the link between helping stress, anxiety and depression
The Independent online, 08/01/2015, Clio Korn Scientists at Oxford University have demonstrated that consumption of prebiotics affects both emotional processing and stress hormone levels in healthy volunteers. The study found that volunteers who took a prebiotic called B-GOS paid less attention to negative words, and more attention to positive ones, than those taking placebo. Volunteers taking B-GOS also had lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol in their saliva after three weeks on the prebiotic than they had at the beginning of the experiment. Author Clio Korn is a GTC DPhil student researching Neuroscience.

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Cracks in the digital map: what the 'geoweb' gets wrong about real streets
The Guardian online, 08/01/2015, Henry Grabar

The 'geoweb' of digital urban maps is full of omissions and distortions. Article includes comment from Mark Graham, a senior research fellow at Oxford Internet Institute.

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Family planning relaxation has little effect on fertility rates: study
Global Times (China), 04/01/2015, Sun Wei The 2013 reforms aimed at relaxing China's 'one-child policy' are likely to have a limited effect on the country's long-term demographic trends, or solve the problem of China's shrinking workforce, according to a report by the University of Oxford and Xi'an Jiaotong University. The researchers explored the effect of reforms which allow couples in which one member is an only child to have two children. Report co-author Stuart Basten, GTC Fellow and associate professor at the University of Oxford, is quoted.

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